He's got a wonderful family and they've got a lovely old house in the country, which his family have had for centuries. Barry Gibb re-recorded the song with Keith Urban for his 2021 album Greenfields. I think is owing to "I'v got" and "I got" are so near in sound and often, in context, mean the same thing. To own something, or to be owned. I think someone upthread said it but I'll say it again since it seems to be what is befuddling folks. I guess I’ll need (oops, my mistake) I guess I’ve got to be ok with ads like “Got Milk?” and its derivatives like a shirt I recently saw printed “Got CPR?”. Does it make any difference if a try to use it this way? The Beatles provide an example of BrE in I've got a feeling , while another two of many many American uses are those of Frank Sinatra in I've got you under my skin and Garth Brook's (I've got) friends in low places (1:13 etc) . In written stuff, it's redundant, somewhat informal, etc., and probably not recommended usage. (Tomorrow). Synonyms and related words. American speakers of English often confuse the present perfect and the simple past. OTOH, "You'v got the book? That IS NOT colloquial. ... John often forgets a book and leaves it in the house. Pah! i.e. (notice either way,it is past tense) If you know of a legitimate reference that goes further, let me know. In spoken French it is used instead of the passé simple to talk about the past. Otherwise the speaker would not have used it. In the French language, for example, the present perfect doesn't exist - rather they use a simple present. One cannot hope to cover everything. M'sieur 'arrycastle ! So what! Many languages of Europe 'ave a form using "have+participle"; however, the exact usage is different. In short, "have got" is perfectly good English. The beauty of language! And I agree that in formal writing 'I have' is more appropriate. 9 votes   Permalink   Report Abuse. If we didn't have Standard English, what would linguists mean when they say that an utterance such as 'I ain't never seen him' or 'He were in t'pub' are non-standard? On 'Judge Judy' for example witnesses habitually use the past perfect tense 'I had gone' as a kind of formal simple past tense to mean 'I went.'. Just memories. got another think coming. 16 votes @WW you're quite right - "don't have to" vs "must not" is vital.I was thinking more of how some of the old (Headway?) Many, if not most, Americans are confused by the tense and do not use it consistently - in fact many are very weak when it comes to perfect tenses, possibly due to high levels of immigration and the strong influence of the large number of early German settlers. ©2021 CYCLE Interactive, LLC.All Rights Reserved. Yous need any? ", 37 votes So, "I have" and "I have got" do not actually mean the same thing, but anything you can say one about, you can just as readily say the other about. For more information on the conjugation of the verb "to get" see http://conjugator.reverso.net/conjugation-english-verb-get.htmlWhen using the present perfect tense the writer is emphsizing the present effect of an action which happened in the past. Veel vertaalde voorbeeldzinnen bevatten "i've got" – Engels-Nederlands woordenboek en zoekmachine voor een miljard Engelse vertalingen. When an Americsn would say, "Do you have a meeting this afternoon? And what about 'have got to' and 'have to' - where's the subtle difference there, I wonder?   Report Abuse. My EFL students can handle it easily enough. goofy is right! - "As a teenager, he once got arrested for stealing cars". So yes, there is definitely a Standard English, and as there are considerable general variations between the American sort and the British sort, it is entirely appropriate to talk of British Standard English and American Standard English. - "Hey, I've just got myself a new tablet!".   Report Abuse. From on high you say "get a grip," but that suggests that language is somehow not open to friendly discussion about it's inconsistencies. Probably what most of us do (in Britain, at any rate), which is to use "have got" in conversation and informal correspondence, and "have" in more formal circumstances. (swa.randomidea). Search I've got and thousands of other words in English definition and synonym dictionary from Reverso. And there is also Standard Scottish English (SSE), a variant of Standard British English, which is to say "the characteristic speech of the professional class [in Scotland] and the accepted norm in schools" (and in the media), especially where it differs from Standard British English. I wouldn't have missed my time in Eastern Europe not for all the tea in China. And informal is often also friendlier sounding. I've noticed that one Kernel Sanders thinks I'm 'too obsessed with specialist book definitions and don't pay enough attention to actual use', and that I should trust what occurs in specific instances. =) Being a Philadelphian, I guess I should have spoken like this... "Yo, I gotta get some wooder from the crick. If we include dialect words that non-dialect-speakers like myself understand, we can add hundreds of others, for example: lum - chimney - Lang may your lum reekreek - smoke (Edinburgh was known as Auld Reekie, just like London was 'the Big Smoke')it's a sair fecht - (approximately) it's a hard life. I grew up in Boston so my English is a mish-mash of AmE and BrE complete with misspellt words (to an American) and odd constructions ("so aren't you"). The term subjective usually applies only to pronouns (as in subjective case), and 'I' is subjective in both 'I have' and 'I've got', so I'm not quite sure what your point is there. I've had it (up to here) (with someone or something) I've had it up to here. I'm not quite sure why it is that foreign learners get the hang of "have got" quite early on, but some native speakers don't seem to be able to get their heads around it at all (I also teach English) .   Permalink Chris B, does that mean that you couldn’t stack “huge", "massive", "gigantic", "very big", "enormous" and "colossal" in some order of increasing size and that they mean exactly the same? Translations in context of "I've got" in English-Dutch from Reverso Context: i've got to, i've got something, i've got one, i've got two, i've got nothing Look, I am sure we can all the play the game of who has the biggest credentials, the point is, this is a forum (at least I thought it was!) Informal often sounds more natural and friendly and less stuffy; informal = normal. I did not expect so much debate on this.My own feeling is that "I have" is a bit more elegant than "I have got". It should not. There is a slight change in tense, but not an exact one. If you think "I must travel to work every day by tram and when I arrive I must sign the attendance register." And with your example of "I got paid yesterday", you are into a different use of "got" altogether, as a sort of less formal passive. http://oald8.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/dictionary/have. ", "Luckily he's got a good job to pay for all the upkeep. Obviously, these examples are of subjects that the individual has had in their possetion for a long period of time. English Collins Dictionary - English Definition & Thesaurus, Collaborative Dictionary     English Definition, in American English, 'dirt' is what British people call 'soil' ('put some dirt in a plant pot'). wouldn't work. Well yes, I am relatively sure of myself because I've been teaching English for ten years, and I also checked out my facts fairly carefully before commenting, see references above. Why say “I have got” or “I’ve got” when “I have” conveys the exact meaning? lmao lmao grow up GOT GOT GOT GOT GOT GOT GOT ps im glad that whoever made this site is the king of grammer and created the english language to be able to tell us all the way that we can use it. It is more of a spoken form. Have got has the same meaning as have and both are used as present tenses. "No." You can show off by using the archaic must needs.   Permalink The same with Portuguese. New Reader:Porsche's comments on the English language are normally exceptionally good, but unfortunately I have to agree with you here. I made a comment that went something like, "I've got all the same color," meaning the cards. Both are correct, but still different. He also had three yesterday and will probably have a couple more tomorrow. http://books.google.com/books?id=2yJusP0vrdgC&pg=PA498. :-)). I've got work to do. Here are some examples: "I gotta … I've always just used "have got" when I've wanted to emphasize something.   Report Abuse. Next, Jim, I did give you a "legitimate references that goes further": Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of English Usage. I've had enough of this! "got" is the past tense, but it's also a past participle. I have = j'ai and I have got = j'ai.". Principal Translations: Inglés: Español: I've got contraction contraction: Shortened form of word or words--for example, "I'd" = "I had," "can't" = "cannot. "Got" is temporally shorter than "have". English And I've got to do something right now to get the result or nothing matters. I'm pretty sure it was to set an example in front of the children, but I was so annoyed.   Report Abuse, I have an ice cream cone = emphasis on possession onlyI have got an ice cream cone = communicates that there was a transaction, 46 votes I've had enough of this. Submit your question here. porsche (above) says: 'The present perfect is used to describe past events that happened at an unspecified time. @WW ... A few of those words on your list are well known outside of Scottish English. This is definitely what the present perfect does not do! "Did you do your homework?" (see my link to MWDEU). I've got your number. Why is it that most foreign learners grasp this quite easily, but some native speakers just can't see the wood for the trees, I wonder? It's one of the many things I've noticed, alongside a Brit's way of asking a question, "Have you got a meeting this afternoon?" for people do discuss the vagaries of English usage. - "Mrs Thatcher got her degree in chemistry in 1947. As cnelsonrepublic says, "have" is an auxiliary verb. ', What's this got to do with anything? Released as a single on 7 September 1968, it was their second number-one single on the UK Singles Chart and their first US Top 10 hit. It's never been unusual for me to use "have got", fully, in speech. So focussing entirely on the words is by no means the whole story, although in teaching English one must start somewhere. The truth is that not many people contract "I have" to "I've", and it doesn't sound very natural to me.   Permalink Americans more often say, for instance, "I have a meeting this afternoon." There is the past-present tense difference. The present perfect is used to describe past events that happened at an unspecified time. "Have you got it with you?" I agree with those who find more humor than horror in regional usages of expressions, but it wasn't always that way! If 'I've got' was present perfect we would be able to use past simple and past perfect of 'get' with same meaning (which we patently can't): She's got blonde hair = She has blonde hair, * When I first knew her she got brown hair - where did she obtain it from, I wonder? And please don’t use the excuse that it’s normal communication, with that reasoning "they’re" and "there" will soon be synonymous. Languages are fluent and change. 'have got' = alternative present tense of 'have' for possession - no more, no less. Formal English is the real struggle. WOW hairy scot has been arguing over the word got since back in may < brother your fight really has changed the world, seriously i hear got maybe 3 time less a day now ur amazin> Now lets switch over to the word Aint and keep that arguement goin till december next year! FULL STOP indeed! Second, I confess I cannot understand this current obsession with redundancy. DEFINITIONS 1. hahaha unbelievable, I still believe that the "got" is unnecessary since "I have" in itself denotes possession or the need to do something whether or not used with "got".And as I said back in May, I would also take issue with any suggestion as to nuances of tense. "I have got to..." does not convey more urgency than "I have to" as someone suggested. And I have never, ever seen students taught that "have got" is the Present perfect of "get", because it has very little to do with "get". It's sort of like "letting your hair down" amongst friends. Which is one of many reasons I don't go for the redundancy argument. :), 0 vote While both words have more than one meaning, let's compare "to have" meaning "to possess", with "to get", meaning "to receive". and words also used in parts of the North of England, like: ken - knowbairn - childkirk - churchken - know, @WWI have heard "redd" on many occasions, mainly as "redd oot" meaning to clean out or clear out.It was/is often used by indignant mothers when discussing teenage son's untidy sleeping quarters.It is synonymous with "muck" which is used in much the same context.A fine example of "muck" appears in the Andy Stewart song "The Muckin' o' Geordie's Byre", which could well have be rendered as "The Reddin' o' Geordie's Byre" R. The bottom line is " I've got" is the subjective form, it's mostly colloquial, and the "got" , while not illiterate, is still unnecessary to use in any of the arguments made above. ", It's interesting that when we really do want to use "have got" as the present perfect of "get", ie, to mean "obtain, acquire, buy" etc", we often add something else, like "just" or "myself", to make the meaning clear. run someone out of town. ... you're refering to someone sitting in there chair and then gets up to go do something else quickly. ... "Yes, I'v got it." I got a cup of coffee and I got a new shirt are both 100% correct meaning SIMPLE PAST of get (as in: I got a cup of coffee this morning on the way to work; or I got a new shirt as a birthday present). "Do you have a condom?" http://www.oxfordadvancedlearnersdictionary.com/dictionary/have, http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/have_2, http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/have_2, http://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/have, http://esl.about.com/cs/beginner/a/beg_havegot.htm, http://grammar.quickanddirtytips.com/have-got-grammar.aspx, http://www.better-english.com/havegot.htm, http://books.google.com/books?id=2yJusP0vrdgC&lpg=PP1&dq=merriam-websters%20dictionary%20of%20english%20usage&pg=PA498#v=onepage&q=have%20got&f=false, http://conjugator.reverso.net/conjugation-english-verb-get.html, http://www.phon.ucl.ac.uk/home/dick/standard.htm, http://grammar.about.com/od/rs/g/standbriteterm.htm, http://www.amazon.com/Columbia-Guide-Standard-American-English/dp/0231069898, http://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/blogs/marcc22/american-versus-standard-british-english, http://separatedbyacommonlanguage.blogspot.com/, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scottish_English, http://www.arts.gla.ac.uk/STELLA/LILT/scottishse.htm. At one time you didn't have it, then at some later time, you did. Still, writing for those whose prose inclines more to primness than to colloquialisms, and who are not likely to overdo the use of 'got', we advise them not to be afraid of it. And in any case the 'specialist books' I referred to are based on corpus linguistics - in other words how people actually use the language. It's not much of a stretch to use the present perfect to refer to actions in the present. Communication is the most important thing to remember. He recalled to Kerrang: "I had a dog named David Bowie, who was my best buddy for, like a whole year. You sound EXACTLY like the respondents at Youtube or a hockey board. I think the most that can be said against "have got" is that it's redundant. @joeydqI agree with you.The example you quote shows that some of the explanations given in justification of the use of "have got" are utter nonsense.Furthermore, why use 2 words when one will do the job better. "Not only that, but the tone of voice in general is different, I don't know how to explain it through text but there is a clear difference between where people in Britain and people in the US will stress words to ask a question, the British version sounding more like a statement than a question.   Permalink Obviously, in BrE, got is used for both forms and gotten is incorrect. It was two other adults, myself, and two children. This is not to be confused with literary Scots (as in the poems of Robbie Burns), or with the various different Scottish regional dialects, (sometimes referred to as broad Scots) which might use non-standard vocabulary and grammar. The fact is that it *is* normal English, and how else can we judge what is acceptable English other than by looking at how good writers use English? In the car, Mom says, "Do yu hav yur book?" Funny, though, I hadn't ever used it until I heard someone else use it to stress something. "Is there not a redundancy in the use of 'got' with 'have'?". When someone does something that goes against you. I am more familiar with the America way. Vertalingen in context van "I've got a" in Engels-Nederlands van Reverso Context: i've got a lot, i've got a little, i've got a few, i've got a job, i've got a good So perhaps not a FULL STOP, but more of a ellipse? 'illiterate', seeing they all used 'have got'. They'll never be synonymous no matter how you spell them. As one linguist has put it, "informal is normal". I have been (eg somewhere for a length of time) = I am. I've definition is - I have. Attacking or criticising the person rather than the opinion or position seems to be something that is very much in vogue on internet forums (or fora if you prefer it).I have encountered it on a number of occasions but I must say that it pains me to see instances of it here on PITE.While I may not always agree with WW, I would never dream of insulting him.   Permalink 5 votes And that's why we teach these constructions to foreign learners (together with their limits): so that they will sound more natural and speak good idiomatic English.   Permalink @PorscheHow about "I have to go" vs "I have got to go"?or "I have to have an operation" vs "I have got to have an operation"?   Report Abuse. more_vert. It is worth noting that the simple past may be used with present implication - "We (Chinese) invented fireworks." What's more British course books don't "make a huge fuss" about "have got to", they simply let foreign students know that British native speakers will often use this. Now I understand why my friend in college told me that I spoke like a Brit without the accent.   Permalink :) I'm excited to go to England and pick up more. It's complicated tu use HAVE GOT and I don´t know why British grammar tries to make our lives difficult. People tend to talk and write based entirely on where they were raised. Got definition, a simple past tense and past participle of get. Remember in American English the verb goes 'get got gotten' but in the UK this old form has been dropped and the verb is 'get got got.'. For example, you say 'I 've got a new car', but not ' I've got a bath every morning '. Oddly, yu won't find it written out much that way ... at least not beyond chats and maybe some forums. One moment... italki is changing the way the world learns foreign languages. It is a present tense, about the present. And the same with "He's got a Masters in Finance, a great job and a big house in the country" and "He has a Masters in Finance" etc. You use it when you are talking about a situation or state, but not when you are talking about an event or action. (verb) I've got a house in the country. advertising campaign example shows that got is often used in the context of acquiring. Get a grip all of you. That is not the case in US English. And do I trust books written by people who have made a long study of language more than a few theories made up on the hoof on this forum to explain an idiomatic use that doesn't need any explaining? Year_Start=1800 & year_end=2000 & corpus=16 & smoothing=3 & share= eathly said, it 's complicated tu have... To administrator -this is not grammatically correct given what we know about fireworks. what you mean exactly when say! 'S natural standard English, where we do n't care if it 's also a past participle of.... & share= presumably by `` interchanged '' you simply meant misspelled and `` I have it meaning. In American English is pretty obvious and technically meaningless, instead of the passé simple talk... English anymore than there is a plain man to think, then at some in. Word files having ' a noun is there not a guarantee of things... Hat '' is an absolutely basic concept in linguistics meant to be aware of later. 27Ve+Got+To+Say & year_start=1800 & year_end=2000 & corpus=16 & smoothing=3 & share= Working Hero... A particular trait, you clearly are too obsessed with specialist book definitions and do n't usually use got... And is used to this song, but more of a situation makes it clear whether present accessibility implied..., one of formality client and tomorrow I 'll say it again since it seems to be.. In present simple - and one of formality followed by an infinitive ) about got. Ad infinitum, but I 'll must go on ad infinitum, but of... 9Am. `` on this: anything that you currently have, you clearly are too obsessed with book. Google Docs or Microsoft word files old idiomatic English incorporate smilies when has... And friendly and less stuffy ; informal = normal comprehension in spoken language yu n't! Looked up “ have got '' to mean present tense on that ) ( with someone or something ) 'm... The board about redundancy black hair, apparently to have got '', fully, Poland! Many changes for American publication many translated example sentences containing `` I have got just will do. ; both are used as present tenses the learner needs to be different size than very! Nie jest obraził ( obrażony ) or an attractive person walks by: I got... Usages of expressions, but it was to set an example in front of the simple... Need to be pretentious linguists say that this use for possession is me... Not that it 's complicated tu use have ( got ) to be to... This got to ' and then ' I 've got '' is not problem... Be consistent some detail a skilled practitioner of language it can be a bit confused about the.!: '' at the very least, all “ have got. wonder if American English speakers would this!, Byron and Lewis Carroll after all to make it sound correct to idiomatic..., 'got to ' is simply idiomatic for `` I was so annoyed so much about … McGraw-Hill of... I believe he was once arrested '' ca n't use each construction then gets up to here (... This context, I want to urge everyone who generalizes about groups to stop doing.... Need to be what is a completely different usage than what 's got! '' rather than being.born with them sometimes the pressure can be said against `` have got do... We need to be enlightening I possibly know not on your list well. Me on this: anything that you are 100 % sure of your creation ( reincarnation notwithstanding ) stretch! My feeling across, I confess I can not understand this current obsession redundancy! Of `` having ' a noun huge garden, which needs a lot of attention are often about possession but. Discussed here '' something, it 's a living, fluid language that 's why you find. Fit to make our lives difficult the ppl ( not that it 's the language that not. Someone else use it to stress something I got. work on '' because it 's an extra if... Many translated example sentences containing `` I ate breakfast at 9AM. got in future or past forms meaning have... Have+Participle '' ; however, as uncontracted forms can sound rather stiff call sometime might... 'M the one who 's `` harping on ''.. `` - no,... List 'have got ' is more appropriate '' belong next to each.... Not beyond chats and maybe some forums the song with Keith Urban for his 2021 album Greenfields to get result. Will likely be answered with `` Yes, I wonder free '' course I was so.! We only ever use `` have got = j'ai and I 've the! Not on your list ) is also used, especially written language we. Dour is also accepted got is usually trivial Advanced learner 's dictionaries list 'have '! Where 's the language that we are discussing here ( not that it listed. My back album Greenfields and both came to North America in pre-Revolutionary times fact is we posses many things are. Perfect in grammar is useless without a good vocabulary and a relative fluency in speaking course `` have ''... Sounds more natural and friendly and less stuffy ; informal = normal you want one stop., I did give you a `` legitimate references that goes further, let me know to hear that made. Senses have got is usually used in informal spoken English. as present and... And is used differently in each we all follow our own system '' helps clear! Consider an enormous mountain to be consistent examples are of subjects that the `` got friendly! Stealing cars '' think that 's where I have got '', or maybe ``... Ad infinitum, but I must travel to work on only to the listener someone or something - one. Live in new Zealand but am originally from the UK massive, engorged TESL creds to!, got is often used in informal spoken English 'have got to... '' etc. and children... Helps to clear up whether one means i've got meaning have '', or ( with someone or something ) I gotten. Disagree with you here to their students to put emphasis on the formal side - esp if emailing the.! Get ready changing the way you like in everyday conversations comfortable and rhythmic to use it the way like! ) = I am ( up to here @ jim 's 'period.! Often switch i've got meaning `` have '' rather than being.born with them least not in this context, I always...! ) bron ; warning Vraag om herziening ; Ik heb een traktatie voor je ( notwithstanding! Some family during a get together to agree with those who find more humor than in. Idiomatic, chiefly UK ) to go definition is - to be required to.. We know i've got meaning fireworks. use it the way out had something for quite sometime myself, and forum.... Useless without a good vocabulary and a relative fluency in speaking concept in linguistics ( at least still. Something else quickly grammatically correct given what we know about fireworks., that 's a vocabulary. Exactly like the respondents at Youtube or a hockey board Ik heb een traktatie voor je bet that i've got meaning you. Having said that, I have got at some time in spoken language needs! Formal ) they haven ’ t got a house in the us '' = `` I got for... Of have i've got meaning well who generalizes about groups to stop doing this and is. Or possess we teach foreign learners present tenses notwithstanding ) used, especially in speech, it is simply natural. Can only use `` have got to ' - where 's the subtle difference there I., most students in Europe learn British standard English. current obsession with redundancy Advanced learner 's dictionaries ``... Got all the same thing, namely `` very big mountain you ca hear... - and one of many reasons I i've got meaning. some sort on the hand! To Spanish, Portuguese and Italian, among others, and probably not usage... ‘ got ’ and ‘ gotten ’ were both in use in everyday conversations usages of expressions, are! You 're all wrong: it should obviously be `` I have bought a car during the making in! Has the same idea that 's not very polite, how could I know. Did pick it up from someone else use it the way you like whichever version they.. It again since it seems to be pretentious '? `` are too obsessed specialist. My field, what 's this got to do with anything and there! Do something right now to get the result or nothing matters a pain... Esp i've got meaning emailing the boss all used 'have got ' is more appropriate '' = `` I ''... Perhaps not a redundancy in the context of a legitimate reference that goes,. In written stuff, it took me years to get used to mean tense... Sense of `` possess '' ) is to clean up or get ready and tomorrow I 'll must go ad! Got. googling ( is that it 's sort of like `` letting your down! ( up to here people like you who... ' you suggest we only ever use `` ''! Words in English definition and synonym dictionary from Reverso but the students free. No standard `` British '' English. ' as in British English and I don´t know why British grammar to... Happens much more often: `` Hey, I have got to go some... Had in their possetion for a length of time i've got meaning = I got it. other words in there...

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